Posting their creation on Reddit, the parent explains theirs was not STL downloaded but entirely created by themself.

Interesting EngineeringBy Susan Fourtan√©

© s4ndm4nn15/Reddit | Parent Recreates Son's Toy Screwdriver with Their Own 3D Printed Version

Three-dimensional printing has been revolutionizing many industries. Nowadays you can print in glass, metal, concrete, and plastic, among other materials. These 3D printers can print an entire house part by part, as well as a tiny piece of jewelry. 
A parent posted on Reddit his newly, and non-STL downloaded, 3D printed plastic toy screwdriver. It's quite an achievement printing without a downloaded file.

How did the person print the screwdriver?

The Redditor who goes by the name of s4ndm4nn15 on the online sharing site, decided to recreate their son's plastic toy screwdriver as he has been lost or destroyed. Part of a specific toy set, the parent set out on their mission to bring back the perfect fit of the plastic screwdriver.
What makes this screwdriver so interesting is that it's the parent's first time using a 3D printer without a downloaded STL. 
These downloadable files give quick and easy access to 3D printer owners to make their own creations. The only thing is that these creations aren't bespoke, or truly made by the person printing the object. 
So when a person says they've managed to recreate a specific model of an object by creating their own file — that's quite something. 
They used the online modeling assistant, Fusion 360, and have shared their STL link for other parents to download and recreate, should their child's toy go missing too. Pretty handy of them. 
A few commentators voiced their concerns that the plastic used may not be child-safe.
However, the parent assured they would add a sealant that is food safe. That said, another commentator mentioned that plastic is most likely one of the least germ-filled materials kids place in their mouths.
We're just glad the kid can continue playing safely and with a full set of toys now.
This article was originally published by Interesting Engineering. 
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