The largest solar project in New Jersey has been completed at Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Earle in Tinton Falls, northwest of Asbury Park. It was designed, procured, and built by CS Energy, which designs and builds projects in the solar, storage, and emerging energy industries.

Electrek, By Michelle Lewis

© Electrek | New Jersey’s largest solar farm has been completed

Project owner Ben Moreell Solar Farm and the Department of the Navy executed a lease for approximately 170 acres of land for the purpose of constructing a 28.5MW ground-mount project. The solar farm is owned by energy and commodities company Vitol Green Holdings LLC.

The solar project will be tied directly to the local utility grid. In case of emergency, and with further investment, the green energy power plant can be modified to power the navy base, which has a combined workforce of more than 1,500 civilian, military, and contractor personnel.

CS Energy has installed more than 80MW of solar energy projects on military bases globally.

Captain Pierre A. Fuller, commanding officer of NWS Earle, said:
Having access to reliable, sustainable, and renewable sources of energy, like solar power, helps our Navy improve our energy security, operational capability, strategic flexibility and resource availabilities. We are equally pleased this is the largest solar project in the state, to date, and it contributes to New Jersey’s Energy Master Plan.
New Jersey’s Energy Master Plan aims to source 100% of its energy from net zero sources by 2050.

Electrek’s Take

We really like this story for two reasons. One, New Jersey is putting its money where its mouth is and making significant progress toward its goal of net-zero by 2050. Who doesn’t love a superlative? They just completed their largest solar farm. And may they beat it with an even bigger one soon!

And second, the fact that the Navy is officially and publicly expressing support for green energy is wonderful. The military is being pragmatic and knows that green energy and EVs are the way forward the green energy and transport movement transcend politics. Thank you, US Navy.

This article was originally published by Electrek. 
Previous Post Next Post